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Adwoa Sarfo To Answer For GHC28.8m MASLOC Sole Sourced Contract



Parliament is set to question the Procurement Minister over claims Microfinance and Small Loans Centre (MASLOC) CEO failed to go through due process in the award of a GH¢28.8 million contract.

Adwoa Sarfo and Stephen Amoah are to answer for the circumstances under which MASLOC purchased 1,800 second-hand vehicles from Germany for GH¢28.8 million

According to Ashaiman legislator Ernest Norgbey, the contract which was awarded to a private firm, Dextro-Impex Company Limited, did not go through competitive bidding.

He claims there was no grounds to have sole-sourced the contract and the award is illegal.

Mr Norgbey also alleges that the Mr Amoah gave Dextro-Impex Company Limited a letter of comfort to allow them raise funds to execute the contract.

“At the time that these contracts were signed there was no board in place but the CEO took it upon himself to do all these things.

“We keep talking about sole sourcing and fighting corruption but if one CEO can take the decision to award a contract worth GH¢28.8 million, then there is every cause to worry,” he said.

According to him, even the Ghana Public Procurement Authority (PPA) cannot give approval to sole source such a contract.

“Under which condition or urgency are they going to authorize MASLOC to procure these cars when there are some conditions that ought to be met?” he quizzed.

Mr Norgbey said although Section 40 of the PPA Act allows for such a transaction to be okayed, the said contract does not qualify.

According to him, the Act is against public officers procuring second-hand vehicles for any state entity.

He believes MASLOC could have opened tender for prospective companies to bid for the supply.

The Ashaiman MP said the CEO must answer why he supported a company which did not have the financial muscle to undertake such a contract which was worth so much money.

“It is total grounds for corruption. I don’t need Martin Amidu [Special Prosecutor] to tell me this is grounds for corruption and this is what we are fighting about.

Mr Norgbey said irrespective of whether the contract was executed or not, the fact that it was awarded shows something was not done right which must be investigated.

“The contract must be reversed…GH¢28.8 can do something for Ghana and we cannot allow people to engage in such improper acts.

The MP said on Wednesday, he will seek answers on the Floor of Parliament from Procurement Minister Adwoa Sarfo regarding which procurement method was used in awarding the contract.

Although Mrs Sarfo has not commented on the allegations, last Friday in Parliament, she indicated her readiness to answer questions regarding the MASLOC contract.



Military deal: Bring the supposed agreement I signed to Parliament – Hanna Tetteh



Former Minister of Foreign Affairs in the erstwhile NDC administration has challenged the Minister of Defense, Dominic Nitiwul to also present to the august house of parliament the previous Ghana-US defence deal she is supposed to have signed for scrutiny as they have done with the new deal.

This she says will make it easier for the honourable members to do a comparison between the two agreements and also help the minister substantiate his point.

In an interview with Gold Power Drive host, Hanna Tetteh said, “I think that from the statements being made by officials of the NPP government, it is clear that this a new agreement. When you are signing a new agreement, it means that any provision you are unhappy with in the previous agreement you have the ability to renegotiate them. So this business of saying that whatever it is that they are bringing to parliament is as a result of things that were done by the previous government, it is just simply trying to pass the back and not taking responsibility for what they themselves have negotiated”.

“When I sign any agreement on behalf of another ministry and in this case the Ministry of Defense, it is not the case it is the Ministry of Foreign Affairs that has negotiated the agreement. The implementing ministry will be the ministry that takes responsibility for negotiating the details and because it is a country to country agreement, it is the reason why it will be signed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs even if the implementing ministry is a different ministry. So this is not an agreement that was negotiated by me as minister of Foreign Affairs, it was signed by me on behalf of the Government Of Ghana and in this particular instance the Ministry of Defense” she explained.

She has also suggested that to make the matter clear and for the purposes of informing the Ghanaian public, the NPP government should make public the agreement that was signed by the previous NDC administration and also explain how that agreement commits the government to continue doing certain things today because she doesn’t believe that is the case.

“I read every agreement before I signed it and I don’t believe in my recollection that I signed any agreement committed Ghana to anything beyond the duration of that particular agreement. You sign an agreement and beyond a point it elapses and after that point, the obligations also elapse and you go ahead negotiate a new one and that is what they have done and this what they are now bringing to parliament for ratification. I haven’t seen that particular agreement that is been discussed because at the moment I was not in Ghana but I want to make it clear that there is nothing in the previous agreement that commits Ghana to the present agreement and if the minister wants to make that clear he should make available copies of that agreement” she pointed out.

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20-year-old RTI Bill likely to be laid in Parliament today



The two decades old Right To Information (RTI) Bill is likely to be laid in Parliament today, Friday, March 23, 2018, following Cabinet consideration Thursday night.

The passage of the Bill will, however, have to wait until at least June this year.

Civil Society Groups including the RTI coalition stepped up pressure after President Akufo Addo’s independence day speech in which he committed to have the Bill presented to Parliament before it rises today, Friday.

It has been 22 years since the first Right to Information RTI Bill was drafted under the auspices of the Institute of Economic Affairs, IEA.

Also, it is 16 years since the Executive arm of government in 2002 drafted the first RTI Bill. The draft Executive Bill was subsequently reviewed in 2003, 2005 and 2007 but was never laid in Parliament until February 5, 2010.

Government is under massive pressure to get the bill laid before parliament rises on Friday, March 23 following fears that the government was deliberately delaying the process.

“The Majority Leader, Osei Kyei Mensah Bonsu expects the Communications Committee of Parliament to study and consult widely on the Bill during Parliament’s recess to enable speedy work when the House reconvenes in May.

“This is not a Bill that can be considered under a certificate of urgency and be completed in one day. So the import of introducing it in Parliament will be for the Committee to be seized of it so that they can take it home during the recess and do the necessary consultation and report back to us mid-May. So that when we come back mid-May into when we shall adjourn again which will be July ending, we would have dealt with it.

” If the coast is clear sign is given, it will have to go to the Assembly press for gazetting, if it does go it can then come back to Parliament which is why I’m telling you it will come to Parliament in that state for it to be referred to the committee.”


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Our sovereignty is not for sale – Ablakwa to US Ambassador



The United States Ambassador to Ghana, Robert P. Jackson should not be telling us [Ghana] that $20million in return for the Ghana-US military cooperation was a good return, the Member of Parliament for North Tongu and Minority Spokesperson on Foreign Affairs, Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwa has said.

According to him, comments by Mr Jackson that Ghana should be grateful for the monetary offer was “very regrettable.”

Based on an earlier memoranda signed in February 1998 and April 2015, the US government has requested for a new defence cooperation with Ghana.

The previous agreements were not known to Ghanaians because they were not taken to Parliament for ratification, even though US military has been in the country under those agreements.

Some variations in the new agreement as compared to the old ones have generated a public debate after it leaked.

The government and the Minority in Parliament have continued to slug it out this week with government justifying the proposed agreement whilst the Minority has called for its immediate withdrawal from Parliament arguing that, it would denigrate the sovereignty and autonomy of the government and the people of Ghana, as well as the laws of the country.

However, in a radio interview on Thursday, the US Ambassador to Ghana suggested that an investment of $20million in the Ghana Armed Forces in one year as part of the Ghana-US defence cooperation was a ‘pretty significant return’ that Ghana ought to be grateful.

But responding, Mr Ablakwa said, “I was disappointed hearing the Ambassador say that. I am unhappy and really depressed hearing that…the Ambassador should not be telling us that $20million is a good return, no!”

“You see, our bilateral relations should go beyond monetary terms, and when the discussion is about sovereignty, it’s about our image, it’s about Ghana’s peace and security, we should not be talking monetary terms,” Mr Ablakwa said in a radio interview with Accra based Joy FM.

The MP questioned: “How much will any country in this world, any country that has patriotic citizens, where they value their nation and respect themselves, will be putting up sovereignty for sale. So it shouldn’t be reduced to a discussion on monetary value.”



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